Hero Horse No 10 – Sefton

SEFTON – a True Cavalry Horse.

On August 29, 1984 Sefton, one of the most famous horses of the Household Cavalry Regiment, retired. This remarkable horse had gained fame for his miraculous survival from injuries sustained in a bomb blast in July 1982 that had killed four members of the Blues and Royals, as well as seven other horses of the regiment. He is nominated by Giles Stibbe, OBE, MA (Hons), who is Director of the Household Cavalry Foundation, one of our chosen charities.

Sefton was being ridden to the Changing of the Guard on Horse Guards Parade on July 20th 1982 when the IRA detonated a car bomb in Hyde Park that claimed the lives of four men and seven horses. Sefton was one of eight horses left injured by the blast, but his injuries were the most severe, including a severed jugular vein, wounded left eye, and 34 wounds over his body. Sefton was the first horse to be removed from the scene and brought back to barracks, where he was treated in an emergency operation lasting over 90 minutes to save his life, and then an additional 8 hours of surgery (a record in veterinary terms in 1982); each of the injuries he’d sustained had the potential to be life threatening. He was given a 50/50 per cent chance of survival.

Over the following months, he made continual progress; his nurse was quoted as saying “He took everything in his stride“. During his time in the hospital he received huge quantities of cards and mints from well-wishers, while donations exceeding £620,000 were received to construct a new surgical wing at the Royal Veterinary College which was named the Sefton Surgical Wing.

Sefton returned to his duties with his regiment, and he often passed the exact spot where he had received such horrific injuries. That year he was awarded Horse of the Year, and took centre stage at the Horse of the Year Show, to a standing ovation. In August 1984 Sefton retired from the Household Cavalry, and moved to the Home of Rest For Horses at Speen, Buckinghamshire where he lived to the age of 30 before having to be put down on July 9, 1993 due to incurable lameness as a complication of the injuries suffered during the bombing.

Even before he become a public name, Sefton had something of a notoriety amongst troopers; he was nicknamed “Sharkey” for his tendency to bite at troopers and horses he didn’t like. Despite ‘passing out’ in June 1968 (marked with the regimental number 5/816) also had something of a reputation for being something of a difficult horse, as he had a tendency for breaking ranks, fidgeting and napping. For these reasons, Sefton was sent with the Blues and Royals on deployment to Germany. He joined the Weser Vale Hunt, a bloodhound pack set up by Captain Bill Stringer, chasing volunteer runners. He quickly became the whipper-in’s mount, and excelled in this task, with a bold jump and fast pace. This made him a very popular horse, and due to his nature, he was not given to recruits to learn on, but offered as a prize for the best recruits to ride.

Sefton also competed in showjumping, and whilst on deployment between 1969 and 1974 won 1434 Deutschmarks of prize money, and made the army team competing for the British Army of the Rhine, as well as competing in and winning a point to point race.

Sefton recovering from the injuries he sustained on July 20th 1982.

In 1975, there was an outbreak of strangles at Knightsbridge Barracks, leaving a shortage of large black horses for ceremonial duties in London. At this time, Sefton had a suspect tendon, possibly due to being overridden, and was immediately chosen to return to England. Here, he worked for the Household Cavalry for the next four years, performing his guard duties, as well as appearing in Quadrilles, and tent pegging. He continued to showjump, including appearances at the Royal Tournament and other smaller shows, although from 1980 he was gradually retired from the sport as he reached the age of 18.

Update from Alice Morgan, Director of Fundraising and Marketing, at The Horses Trust.

Sefton returned to his duties with his regiment in 1982 and he often passed the exact spot where he had received such horrific injuries. That year he was awarded Horse of the Year and took centre stage at the Horse of the Year Show with Echo, to a standing ovation.

Cavalry horses Sefton and Yeti and Metropolitan police horse, Echo, who survived the attack, were retired from their duties to The Horse Trust to live out the remainder of their days in peace and tranquility in 1984.

Sefton passed away peacefully at The Horse Trust on 9th July 1993 aged 30 and was taken to the DATR at Melton Mowbray to be laid to rest. His bravery and courage in the face of adversity will always be remembered, and is memorialised in Sefton’s Barn at our Home of Rest.

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